St. Thomas University Expands Minority Students Reach Plus Fellows Leadership Opportunities

November 12, 2010

MIAMI, (MetroCatholic) — Miami’s St. Thomas University was once again selected as a National Partner for the Cristo Rey Network that includes 24 Catholic high schools and 6,500 students. The University Partner Initiative, which includes Georgetown and Boston College, seeks to formalize strategic relationships with colleges and universities committed to supporting Cristo Rey Network students. The partnership is regarded as the platform upon which future programs will be built to ensure post-secondary access and success for Cristo Rey Network students.

“This partnership is an important aspect of St. Thomas University fulfilling its mission of Developing Leaders for Life,” says St. Thomas President, Monsignor Franklyn M. Casale. “Cristo Rey students represent the future of this nation and we are honored to partner in the preparation of the next generation of world leaders.  Cristo Rey Network students will be an important addition to our already diverse and talented student body.”

Expanding the leadership mission, new initiatives have been spearheaded through the NASPA Undergraduate Fellows program (NUFP), which mentors undergraduate students wishing to explore and get immersed in the student affairs field. Two STU students - Diego Sanchez and  David Brown - have been selected for the prestigious National Association of Student Personnel Administrators (NASPA) Undergraduate Fellows Program.  Both juniors and members of STU’s Student Government Association, Sanchez and Brown, will be mentored by Dr. Beatriz Gonzalez Robinson and Issac M. Carter, respectively.  Dr. Gonzalez Robinson is Vice President for Planning & Enrollment at St. Thomas and serves and the NASPA-FL Latino/a Knowledge Community Chair and Mr. Carter, Dean of Students for STU, serves and the Chair for the Men & Masculinities Knowledge Community, NASPA-FL. Students and mentors apply as a pair, and if selected are provided the foundation to establish a semi-structured mentoring relationship at their institution. Fellows are also given the opportunity to attend a national conference, participate in paid internships, and participate in the Summer Leadership Institute. The mission of the NUFP is to increase the number of historically disenfranchised and underrepresented professionals in student affairs and/or higher education.

Mathcounts Reinstates Homeschool Teams

August 23, 2010

PURCELLVILLE, Va. (MetroCatholic) — Last Friday, Mathcounts, a prestigious foundation dedicated to advancing math skills among middle school students, partially reversed its August 17th ban on homeschool teams.

For the upcoming 2010-11 school year homeschool teams who participated in last year’s Mathcounts competition will be grandfathered in and allowed to compete this year. “We appreciate Mathcounts making this change,” said Michael Smith, president of HSLDA. “Many homeschoolers were already hard at work preparing for this year’s competition,” he added.

The initial ban on homeschool teams stemmed from Mathcounts’ difficulties identifying homeschool competitors and ensuring that students from public, private, and homeschools are treated equally.

In order to make sure all options were being considered representatives from HSLDA and Mathcounts met on Friday, August 20th. The policy change was the result of the meeting as well as a commitment to find a long-term solution which would allow homeschoolers to compete as teams.

Home School Legal Defense Association (HSLDA) is a 27-year-old, 85,000 member non-profit organization and the preeminent association advocating the legal right of parents to homeschool their children.

Vatican sports foundation criticizes FIFA for trying to ban religious expressions

July 20, 2010

Rome, Italy  (CNA) — The president of the John Paul II Foundation for Sports, Eddio Constantini, has severely criticized the president of the International Soccer Association Board (FIFA), Joseph Blatter, for seeking to prohibit religious speech during matches. Blatter’s action came after the Brazilian team huddled for a prayer at the conclusion of the Confederations Cup.

Constantini explained that “Blatter and the soccer federation Denmark are mistaken, it is an error to purge sports of those ethical values that the Christian faith and the Catholic Church have defended for centuries.”

His statements came in response to comments by the FIFA president about the Brazilian players huddling for prayer after their victory over the United States. He called their gesture “a danger” and said there was “no room for religion in soccer.”  Blatter has also promised he would prohibit any kind of religious expression during the 2010 World Cup in South Africa.

Constantini said the comments by Blatter were not new and pointed to his “ultimatum” to the Brazilian team for a similar gesture after the 2002 world championships.  “I would argue that it is precisely the gradual abandoning of religious and ethical values that has been the cause of the moral degradation that is affecting soccer and sports in general,” he added.

“Only a revolution from below that is capable of training wholesome athletes and individuals will be able to restore the authentic meaning to sports that is under threat from violence, drugs, racism and money,” Constantini stated.

The John Paul II Foundation for Sports was launched in July of 2008.  Among its objectives is the organization of a triennial program of national and international sporting events focused on promote human dignity, especially among young people.

On that occasion Constantini said it was not coincidental that the launching of the Foundation coincided with the opening of the Pauline Year.  “In his letters St. Paul often refers to the Christian life as a sports race which at the end will be awarded with an imperishable crown.”

DonationsTracker.com - Make a Donation to Donation

SCPI Study on Aborted Fetal DNA in Vaccines Presented at International Meeting for Autism Research

June 3, 2010

Seattle, Washington  (MetroCatholic) -Sound Choice Pharmaceutical Institute’s (SCPI) founder and lead scientist, Dr Theresa Deisher, presented their ongoing study into the possible link between aborted fetal DNA in several childhood immunizations with Autism and Austim Spectrum Disorder (ASD) at the International Meeting for Autism Research in Philadelphia, PA May 20-22, 2010.

The study which was met with both shock and gratitude for her work, focused on “improper integration of the residual DNA as a possible contributor to autism, particularly in genetically susceptible infants.”

“It is known from gene therapy studies that injected naked DNA can be transported to the brain (Wang et al. 2001); that improperly integrated therapeutic DNA has caused cancer in young children (Hacein-Bey-Abina et al. 2008); and that shorter DNA fragments have a higher probability of entering the nucleus [of the cells] (Lechardeur et al. 2002)”, noted Dr Theresa whose company recently received a $500,000 grant from the Murdock foundation for their research.

Dr Deisher, along with Physicist Marissa LaMadrid, PhD are investigating whether improper insertion of DNA into the vaccine recipient cells can cause autism.  Four major areas of the research involve:

(1) measuring the amount and length distribution of residual human DNA in vaccines;
(2) predicting sites of DNA insertion via homologous recombination (HR) and measure insertion rates;
(3) modeling how brain cell function might be affected, either via loss of the ability to make proper connections or via selective growth of cells with improperly integrated DNA at the expense of healthy cells;
(4) conducting epidemiology studies comparing autism rates in children injected with vaccines containing human DNA residuals.

The results reported thus far were startling, to say the least.

“Changepoint analysis of autism disorder demonstrates a temporal correlation with events associated with human DNA residuals in vaccines. The levels of residual DNA are well over FDA-recommended limits”, stated Dr Deisher.  “Meruvax-II contains >140ng/vial ssDNA and >30ng/vial dsDNA, with average lengths of 215bp. Havrix contains >270ng/vial ssDNA and >30ng/vial dsDNA. The FDA-recommended amounts are 10ng/dose.”

While research has been conducted in the past on a possible link between thimerosal and autism, no one has ever looked at the contaminating DNA, something requested for years by Children of God for Life, a pro-life watchdog focused on the use of aborted fetal material in vaccines, medicines and other consumer products.

“Until the advent of AVM Biotechnology and their non-profit arm SCPI we had little hope that anyone would invest the time and money to do this study”, stated Children of God for Life’s founder, Debi Vinnedge.

“Dr Deisher’s work is a blessing to hundreds of thousands of families, if not millions worldwide.  She is a direct answer to our prayers for a biotech company focused solely on moral research and ethically produced vaccines and therapeutics.”

SCPI’s work on ethical alternatives to aborted fetal vaccines was recently highlighted in the Puget Sound Business Journal. For more information, including the Washington news story and scientific data from their study see www.cogforlife.org/scpiautismstudypress.htm

Home | About | Archives | Advertising | Contact | Privacy Policy

MetroCatholic, Inc · 5604 Belton Ln. · Suite 400 · McKinney, TX 75070
Ph. (972) 400-2423 · Fax (888) 248-7696

The sites and respective links above offer additional information on the Catholic faith. Please note that DFW Catholic is not officially associated with any of these sites and is unable to effectively monitor all information contained therein. Please use your own judgement when visiting these or any websites. If you find information that is objectionable, contact us.

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-No Derivatives License. You may republish an article without request provided the content is not altered and it is clearly attributed to "MetroCatholic". Any Internet re-publishing of original MetroCatholic articles MUST additionally include a live link to http://www.dfwcatholic.org. Republishing of articles on DFWCatholic.org that have come from other news sources as noted is subject to the conditions of those sources. MetroCatholic may at times publish content that is taken from the internet and thus considered to be in the public domain. Anyone contrary to the publication of said content need only to contact the editorial office which will immediately proceed to remove the content.