Upper Elementary(3-5)Teacher – Spiritus Sanctus Academy – Plymouth (Plymouth, MI)

This is a syndicated post from CatholicJobs.com. [Read the original article...]

UPPER ELEMENTARY(3-5)TEACHER
Education: Elementary, FT Employee
Spiritus Sanctus Academy – Plymouth (Plymouth, MI)

Spiritus Sanctus Academy in Plymouth, Michigan, is accepting applications for an enthusiastic and committed elementary teacher for the 2014-2015 school year. Successful candidates will posses the following qualifications:

A practicing Catholic, passionate about creating and nurturing a Catholic culture in the classroom and throughout the school;

Current State of Michigan Teaching Certificate in Elementary Education (K-5) (or certification from a state with a reciprocal agreement with Michigan);

A creative collaborator possessing strong communication and organizational skills.

Previous experience teaching in a Catholic school is preferred.

Participation in the VIRTUS program, or proof of such participation, will be required.

Qualified candidates should send or fax resume to:

Sr. Maria Faustina, OP
Spiritus Sanctus Academy
10450 Joy Rd.
Plymouth, MI 48170
Fax: 734-414-8495

or email electronic copy to:
email: [email protected] (8)

Prayer Vigils in U.S. Mark Desperate Plight of Iraqi Christians

This is a syndicated post from The Daily Register. [Read the original article...]

By CHARLOTTE HAYS | WASHINGTON — When parishioners at St. Thomas the Apostle Church in northwest Washington quietly filed into their pews for a July 28 “Vigil for the Persecuted Church in Iraq,” some were perplexed by the unfamiliar symbol on the… (10)

Assistant Marketing Designer – Liturgy Training Publications (Chicago, IL)

This is a syndicated post from CatholicJobs.com. [Read the original article...]

ASSISTANT MARKETING DESIGNER
Marketing/Advertising, FT Employee
Liturgy Training Publications (Chicago, IL)

Reports to: Marketing & Sales Manager

Experience Required: College degree, solid experience working in Mac environment with a background in design or graphic arts.

Description: This position assists the Marketing Designer, Marketing staff, and Marketing Manager in coordinating and executing the fiscal year promotions plan by designing and producing promotional materials, ads, workshop/conference promotional needs, organizing projects for archives and electronic files when completed. The Assistant Marketing Designer also needs to be involved in web site design and maintenance, creating and updating flash pages as needed. This position needs to work to ensure all projects maintain established design specifications and LTP standards to guarantee marketing’s quality.

Requirements: Liturgy Training Publications is seeking an Assistant Marketing Designer with a college degree and experience working in a Mac environment. The candidate must have a design or graphic arts background and excellent knowledge of design and color principles. Experience in marketing design is a plus. The candidate must be proficient in Adobe’s Creative Suite of applications on the Mac platform and excellent skills using MS Outlook with a familiarity with HTML and Office Suite in general. Candidate must be comfortable (and proficient) designing for print and web, in both large and small formats, and have knowledge of proofreader’s marks. The ability to customize design efforts to market segments or specific audience, analyze situations and show flexibility and adaptability when meeting deadlines, and ability to organize and complete multiple work assignments on time is essential.

If you are interested in being considered for this opening, please prepare the following documents in Microsoft Word (.doc) format. You must include a cover letter describing the reason(s) for your interest, a resume (please include a portfolio of your work), three references including job title, phone number and email address of contact, and salary history to [email protected] Incomplete submissions will not be considered.

Organization: Liturgy Training Publications

Location: 3949 South Racine Avenue, Chicago, IL 60609

Contact: Maureen Como, email: [email protected], website: www.ltp.org (9)

Diplomat: fight human trafficking by giving prominence to persons

This is a syndicated post from CNA Daily News. [Read the original article...]

Vatican City, Jul 30, 2014 / 02:56 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- At a Vatican conference held Tuesday to mark the World Day against Trafficking, a U.S. diplomat emphasized that the scourge will not be ended until the economic attitudes that lead to human trafficking are changed.

“One cannot simply protect the victims, and bring the victims into a place of safety, if one doesn’t do anything to change the underlying cultural assumptions that help create and foster this slavery, this exploitation, if one does not change the underlying economic assumptions that treat people as commodities,” Luis CdeBaca, the U.S. ambassador at large for trafficking in persons, said July 29 via videolink.

CdeBaca lamented that “governments will always try to reclassify things so they are not defined as human trafficking to protect their fishing industry, to protect their palm oil industry, to protect their charcoal industry, to protect their ability to bring in nannies or people to come and build their stadiums for upcoming sporting events.”

He was speaking to a conference hosted by the Pontifical Academy of Social Sciences, the U.S. embassy to the Holy See, and the Global Freedom Network, about the U.S. state department's 2014 trafficking in persons report.

The event, which has an interrreligious basis – the Global Freedom Network being an alliance of Catholic, Anglican, and Muslim leaders – marked the first World Day against Trafficking, observed July 30.

Joining CdeBaca in the discussion were Bishop Marcelo Sanchez Sorondo, chancellor of the Pontifical Academy for Social Sciences, and Ken Hackett, U.S. ambassador to the Holy See.

The academy has become in the last year a key player in the fight against human trafficking, at the direction of Pope Francis.

“After a meeting we had with the members of the academy, I sent a letter to Pope Francis in which I asked him if he had suggestions for issues to be developed,” Bishop Sanchez told CNA.

“He responded with a personal letter, saying that he deemed it important that the pontifical academy should focus on human trafficking.”

The U.S. state department issued the human trafficking report June 20; it details the state of this blight in 188 nations. It is focused on “3Ps”, CdeBaca said: prevention, protection, and prosecution.

He emphasized that “one can’t prevent trafficking or protect its victims without holding traffickers responsible for the acts they have committed,” and added that while progress has been made in anti-trafficking laws, the political will to eradicate the trafficking of persons is often still lacking.

“My biggest concern is that as a global community we tend to chase the last tragedy … so last year we were suddenly all concerned about fire safety in Bangladeshi garment factories,” he noted.

“Instead of dealing with the labour recruiters that are feeding people into these factories, or the retailers, asking why they let this slavery happen … we’re concerned about getting fire extinguishers in the factories … so a little bit of change happens, but not enough systemic change to bring us closer to our goal.”

Bishop Sanchez noted that while 44,000 survivors of human trafficking were identified in the past year, “more than 20 million victims of trafficking were not.”

He added that organized crime's annual profits are estimated at $150 billion, and that 80 percent of this sum is from prostitution.

“Some observers speculate that, within ten years, human trafficking will surpass drugs and weapons trafficking to become the most profitable activity in the world,” Bishop Sanchez maintained.

Hackett lamented that human trafficking is “an issue that transcends cultures, nationalities, societies, and economical or political structures … touching virtually every part of our global community.”

“It leaves no corner of our world unaffected.”

(10)

Are our Homilists “actively participating?"

This is a syndicated post from The Chant Café. [Read the original article...]

Well, someone has to ask this question now and again occasionally. Being long of tooth and a born curmudgeon, I’ll take the blowback. But I don’t expect much to actually come my way in this life, at least.

To be brutally frank, I’m done, exhausted with, recoil from even reading or hearing this clumsy phrase, “active participation.” Expiating it in Latin ain’t any better, just sayin’.

I’ve never suffered from this malaise personally since crossing the Tiber over four decades ago. I don’t carry a bag of angry cats that, when I walk through the doors of a church, I display as a reason not to take up my responsibility as a worshipper. If in a foreign parish and someone announces a hymn or ordinary setting is to be sung now, I sing it. What else am I supposed to do? I chose to come to church, to worship, in the manner prescribed and fully because I like God, quite a bit actually, and love Him as Christ and enjoy the Spirit’s breath expelled that becomes both text and song in that most sublime of arts.

I noticed young Mr. Yanke’s article published today just before this one, I also saw it on Fr. Keye’s FB entry, so this Fr. Gismondi’s interview must be quite something. I’ll get around to it. Or maybe not.

Because, I’ve disavowed my own personal culpability for other folks’ bag of cats that keep them from full engagement in the greatest act, or drama that we humans can re-create that provides us with true succor and hope in this despairing world.

Besides, if a groaner/moaner about the sorry state of “singing in church” want’s to point a bony finger of indignation towards THE responsible party, I direct them toward the guy in the alb and chasuble. If the celebrant upon at the “presider’s” chair cannot or won’t manage to intone the “In Nomine Patris….” or any other orations as he is virtually disciplined to do in Musicam Sacram, well, I’d be surprised if the entrance hymn sung prior to that moment was lustily taken up by the congregation. (And have all of us who frequent here also had the recurrent thought “Thank God for the choir, bless their hearts” for taking up that slack, such as they are!”?) Because the equation of that mandated wisdom from 1967 (!) is pure simplicity in action, a physics truism even- for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction!

If Father, OTOH, chooses to lead and no matter how humbly or magnificently he chants his proper portions, and the response he receives is the chirping of crickets, Father should grab the processional cross and clear the temple of the rabble who are there for “other” purposes, lock the doors (keeping a server or two) and sing a private Mass honorably.

And, at long last, to the point of the title of this little rant, John I, 1. “In the beginning there was the WORD…..” The homily remains almost a sacrosanct vestigial remnant of a time when people actually had something to say to one another. Whether it was in antiquity with Cicero or St. Paul, St. Francis or Martin Luther, Jonathan Edwards or John Adams, or in our lifetimes with names like Churchill, King Jr., Sheen, Ghandi, and their ilk, the act of one inspired soul’s words crafted with conviction and purpose to remind large gatherings of other souls’ to listen, to savor, to digest and to transform themselves through those noble thoughts bravely spoken seems to have all but disappeared from our ambos and pulpits.

From what I know of the historical Jesus, he wasn’t a song and dance sort of guy. He didn’t attract crowds of listeners like Cagney in a top hat crooning “I’m a Yankee Doodle Dandy.” In the current cycle of Gospel readings we are reminded again and again of the unimaginable power of the story, the parable, the spoken word from a sage to the masses.

So, if we musicians must fret about something as it seems we must always, let us worry about how we can gently and firmly remind our clerical brothers that we choose our repertoire for a reason, we rehearse it thoroughly for a reason, we literally pray that it be taken up or listened to with intent that is pure and unabated by banality or poor improvisation and padding.

Just as every Sanctus sung is literally prefaced with the anamnesis that we are conjoined with choirs of angels IN THAT VERY MOMENT, every homilist ought to re-approach the ambo after the gospel reading as if he is to give the Sermon on the Mount.

(13)

Math Teacher – St. Timothy Catholic School (Chantilly, VA)

This is a syndicated post from CatholicJobs.com. [Read the original article...]

MATH TEACHER
Education: Middle/High School, FT Employee
St. Timothy Catholic School (Chantilly, VA)

St. Timothy’s Catholic School is looking for an experienced middle school math teacher. The candidate should posses deep content knowledge, familiarity with instructional technologies, effective classroom management competence, and strong communication skills. The candidate should be a practicing Catholic with a love of our faith. We are seeking a dedicated and passionate professional who will actively contribute to our learning community. (11)

Migration fix must look at big picture, bishop encourages

This is a syndicated post from CNA Daily News - US. [Read the original article...]

Washington D.C., Jul 30, 2014 / 01:58 pm (CNA/EWTN News).- The head of the U.S. bishops’ migration committee challenged U.S. President Obama and the leaders of Central America to respond to violence in that region in order to protect children who are being forced to flee.

“Over the long-term, a strategy must be devised to address the violence and lack of opportunity in the countries of Central America,” said Auxiliary Bishop Eusebio Elizondo of Seattle, and “(s)pecific attention should be paid to helping at-risk youth remain safe and access opportunity at home.”

“Instead of cooperating on intercepting them and sending them back to dangerous situations, the leaders should work together to protect them from those dangers, including providing them asylum in neighboring countries and in the United States,” he said in a July 24 statement.

More than 52,000 unaccompanied minors have been apprehended in the U.S. this year, a number which has doubled since 2011. It is projected that by the end of the fiscal year, 90,000 unaccompanied minors will have arrived in the United States, fleeing ongoing violence in Central America.  

Bishop Elizondo urged the region’s leaders to address the ongoing violence and instability within Central America, in order to adequately examine the influx of unaccompanied minors to the U.S.

Alluding to a July 25 meeting scheduled between President Obama and the presidents of Guatemala, El Salvador, and Honduras, the bishop said that discussion on the situation must address the “root causes of violence.”

“The leaders should focus upon the protection of these children and families, as they are charged with as the heads of their nations,” he explained.

The U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops has stated opposition to the deportation of unaccompanied minors, without first giving them an immigration hearing.

“Families, as well, should receive a fair hearing of their asylum claims,” said Bishop Elizondo.

Rather than simply “send(ing) children back to harm,” he voiced hope that the United States will find a way to “humanely respond to this situation.”

 

(11)

Major Gifts Officer – Diocese of Venice in Florida (Venice, FL)

This is a syndicated post from CatholicJobs.com. [Read the original article...]

MAJOR GIFTS OFFICER
Executive, FT Employee
Diocese of Venice in Florida (Venice, FL)

The Diocese of Venice seeks a Major Gifts Officer to manage the relationship process for all major gift donors and prospects throughout the ten counties of Southwest Florida. The ideal candidate must have fundraising experience and demonstrated success in the identification, qualification, cultivation and solicitation of significant gifts. The successful candidate must have a strong commitment and knowledge of the teaching of the Roman Catholic Church and the vision and mission of the Diocese of Venice.

Qualifications: A proven track record with personal solicitation and portfolio management; strong interpersonal skills, excellent oral and written communication skills, organization and attention to details; ability to analyze and synthesize complex material and use it to develop strategic fund development plans and to present an appropriate, well-informed message to donors; experience with donor database, Raisers Edge preferred; strong computer literacy, including ability to use word processing, spreadsheet and conduct research for prospective donors; ability to write a range of correspondence from business letters to thank you notes; excellent judgment and diplomacy; ability to work under pressure and with deadlines; undergraduate degree, advanced degree preferred.

Qualified candidates are invited to email a cover letter, salary requirements and name of their parish along with an attached resume to [email protected] (12)

Are You Actually Participating at Mass?

This is a syndicated post from The Chant Café. [Read the original article...]

As many of you are acutely aware, one of the difficulties often faced by the reform of the reform is the common understanding of active participation. The cries of “active participation” are often made to musicians and pastors who advocate and work for a return of more sacred things to the Mass, such as the increasing use of Latin, from both the loft and the sanctuary.

I recently saw this video shared on social media, and found the caller’s view quite similar to the views held by many people. I think Father Gismondi does a great job of explaining the situation more fully, in particular, the distinction between active participation and actual participation.

(10)

10 Reasons Men Should Practice Custody of the Eyes

This is a syndicated post from Aggie Catholics. [Read the original article...]

10 Reasons Men Should Practice Custody of the Eyes

10 – It helps teach discipline. 
Men should discipline themselves to be in control of their passions and not allow passions to control them.

9 – It avoids the near occasion of sin.
To avert your eyes when you feel tempted to use a woman lustfully is a good thing.
“But I say to you, everyone who looks at a woman with lust has already committed adultery with her in his heart.” -Matt 5:19.

8 – Custody of the eyes builds up chastity.
Chastity means properly ordering our sexuality to our current state in life (single, married, religious, priest). If we do not have custody of the eyes, it means our sexuality is dis-ordered toward objectification – not love – and needs to be healed.

7 – It is what every gentleman should do.
No woman who respects herself wants to be lusted after or looked up and down. No real gentleman would dishonor a woman by doing so.

6 – It helps a man to see the whole woman, not just parts of her body.
When most men see an immodestly-dressed woman, their brains automatically start to objectify her. Thus, men need to be able to see the truth about who a woman is – not just to break her down into objects he can use for his selfish pleasure.

5 – It avoids scandal.
Think of King David. If he would have practiced custody of the eyes he might have been able to avoid much worse sins – adultery and murder. Now think of what happens when a man is caught in a lustful look toward a woman.

4 - It helps fight off temptation.

Men suffer from sexual temptation frequently. To have custody of the eyes helps a man to fight off an even stronger temptation of lusting after a woman after he looks at her.

3 – It helps our sisters not feel objectified.
If for no other reason, we should witness to the dignity of a woman by controlling our passions. While our sisters in Christ should also help by dressing modestly, even an immodestly dressed woman is made to be loved.

2 – It is a virtue we should chase after.
It is related to chastity, modesty, and temperance. Without self-control, we are unable to give ourselves away in love. We can’t give what we don’t control.

1 – It focuses us back on more important things.
“Seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be given you besides.” – Matt 6:33
Christ should be our first priority. Honoring the height of his creation (our sisters) should be the second. We should be third.

———————————–

This post is a  follow-up to Top 10 Reasons Women Should Dress Modestly.
Other related links are below.

RELATED LINKS:
**The Myth That Women Are To Blame For a Man’s Lust
**Killing The Red Lizard of Lust
**Reflections On The Questions Of Modesty
**Is Pre-Marital Sex Always Wrong?
**How Women Objectify Men
**Les Miserables and Women’s Fashion
**The Impact of Over-Sexualization of Girls
**Internet + Bathing Suits = Bad Idea
**Advertising, Beauty, and Self-Perception
**Top 10 Reasons Women Should Dress Modestly (10)

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