Mar 04, About Today for Monday of the 3rd week of Lent

This is a syndicated post from Divine Office - Liturgy of the Hours of the Roman Catholic Church. [Read the original article...]

March 4

Saint Casimir

Optional Memorial

Saint Casimir, son of the king of Poland, was born in 1458. He practiced the Christian virtues with special regard to chastity and kindness to the poor and was zealous in the faith, particularly in his devotion to the holy eucharist and the Virgin Mary. Casimir died of consumption in 1484.1

Saint Casimir Jagiellon (October 3, 1458 – March 4, 1484), was a Polish-Lithuanian prince from the Jagiellon dynasty who became a patron saint of Poland, Lithuania, and youth.

St. Casimir was the grandson of Jogaila and was the second son of king of Poland and Grand Duke of Lithuania Casimir IV and Queen Elisabeth of Austria. His grandfather was Albert II Habsburg, king of Bohemia, king of Hungary, and “King of the Romans” in the Holy Roman Empire.

From the age of nine, St. Casimir received his education from Fr. Jan D?ugosz and Filippo Buonaccorsi (also known as Filip Callimachus). When Casimir was thirteen he was offered the throne of Hungary by factions discontented with king Mattias Corvinus. Casimir, who was eager to defend the Cross against the Turks, accepted the call and went to Hungary to receive the crown. His uncle W?adys?aw III, king of Poland and Hungary, had earlier been killed in battle at Varna in 1444. Casimir was unsuccessful in his undertaking and returned as a fugitive. He again became the pupil of Fr. D?ugosz in 1475. His father, King Casimir IV, had initiated him well into public affairs and when his brother W?adys?aw, ascended to the Bohemian throne, Casimir became heir-apparent to the throne of Poland. In 1479, the king went to Lithuania for five years, and Casimir was left in charge of Poland. From 1481-1483 he administered the state with great prudence and justice. His father tried to arrange a marriage with a daughter of Emperor Frederick III, but Casimir preferred to remain single. Weakened by excessive fasting, he developed severe lung problems, possibly tuberculosis. On a journey to Lithuania in 1484, he died at Hrodna, Belarus. His remains were interred in Vilnius, Grand Duchy of Lithuania. There is a Chapel of Saint Casimir in Vilnius Cathedral where his remains rest.

St. Casimir lived and reigned with great dignity and possessed great charm and character. Several miracles are ascribed to him. He was canonized by Pope Adrian VI in 1522 and is the patron saint of Lithuania. On June 11, 1948, Pope Pius XII named Saint Casimir the special patron of all youth.

The towns of Kv?darna and Nemunaitis in Lithuania have Saint Casimir depicted on their Coat of Arms.1

Sources:
1. Liturgy of the Hours
2. Wikipedia.org

Note: Optional Memorials and Commemorations are optional celebrations and, at present, we do not include content specific to these special days. This “About Today” is provided so that you can celebrate this Saint as you worship Christ.

The English translation of The Liturgy of the Hours (Four Volumes) ©1974, International Commission on English in the Liturgy Corporation. All rights reserved. Used with permission by Surgeworks, Inc for the Divine Office Catholic Ministry. DivineOffice.org website, podcast, apps and all related media is © 2006-2011 Surgeworks, Inc. All rights reserved. (177)

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